Pin Me

Job Options for the Aging Nurse

written by: C.D. Crowder•edited by: Ginny Edwards•updated: 3/6/2011

Age doesn't have to slow down a nurse's career. There are many job options for the aging nurse. In fact, many employers are doing their best to keep older nurses on their staff to mentor the newer nurses. From moving up to choosing a different area of nursing entirely, job options are available.

  • slide 1 of 7

    Management

    Nurses For nurses who love where they are, a management position, such as a healthcare executive or hospital administrator may be best. The position requirements are less demanding physically, while still requiring a nurse's knowledge of healthcare and the inner workings of a hospital. Nurses moving into one of these positions are able to help more patients, along with doctors and other nurses to ensure the hospital has the proper funding and equipment.

    A nurse who isn't ready to take on the full responsibilities of a hospital or organization may be better suited to managing a group of nurses. Though this position is similar to that of a regular nurse, older nurses oversee the work of others, requiring less physical activity. This gives the nurses a chance to mentor others and ensure patients receive proper care from newer nurses.

    Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons / JollyRoger

  • slide 2 of 7

    Education

    One of the most popular job options for the aging nurse is education. Many schools, including high schools, community colleges and universities are always looking for experienced nurses to teach their nursing classes. Teaching hospitals often employee older nurses to guide interns and help with the newer nurses.

    Education is essential to becoming a successful nurse. Aging nurses can take their experience from the field and provide insight that no one else can. Nurses no longer need to take care of patients, but instead, educate others.

  • slide 3 of 7

    Medical Writer

    Over time, a nurse's medical knowledge rivals that of most doctors. A nurse can choose to share that knowledge by becoming a medical writer. From writing textbooks to research material for pharmaceutical companies, a nurse can write for a single company or become a freelance writer. Many places, especially websites, are eager for writers with medical knowledge and experience to write columns on drug interactions, symptoms, care tips and guidance on those wanting to join the medical field.

  • slide 4 of 7

    Legal Nurse Consultant

    When a medical liability case occurs, older nurses can serve as a consultant for the attorney. Their expertise in the healthcare industry allows them to provide helpful insight that others may miss. From being an expert witness or analyzing medical evidence, job options for the aging nurse are plentiful in the legal field.

  • slide 5 of 7

    Smaller Job Environment

    If you still love what you do, but can't handle a larger, hectic environment, the best job option for a nurse is to simply find a smaller environment. Local clinics, hospice care settings or a much smaller hospital can take much of the stress away from an older nurse. A nurse has fewer patients and less running around than they would have in a larger environment, such as an emergency room in a hospital.

  • slide 6 of 7

    Consultant

    Older nurses often choose to become consultants for businesses in the medical industry, such as those developing medical equipment, architects for hospitals and clinics, drug companies and insurance companies. They can choose to work for a single company or become an independent consultant, working when and where they choose. This is one of the most flexible job options for the aging nurse.

  • slide 7 of 7

    References

    About.com Health Careers - http://healthcareers.about.com/od/nursingcareers/p/NonClinicNurse.htm

    Monster.com Career Advice - http://career-advice.monster.com/career-development/changing-careers/nursing-careers-beyond-the-bedside/article.aspx