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Basket Weave Crochet Made Simple

written by: Jessica Cook•edited by: Rebecca Scudder•updated: 6/20/2011

Learn how to make a basket weave crochet stitch. Use the stitch to make a dish cloth with free pattern!

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    Basket Weave: A Great Textured Crochet Stitch

    One of the things I love about crochet is all the texture you can put into a project. The Basket Weave crochet stitch is full of texture.Using front and post back stitches you can create a basket weave pattern in your crochet projects.

    In order to practice the basket weave crochet stitch, we're going to use it to make a dish cloth or facial scrubber, whichever you prefer. Use cotton or acrylic yarn to give your dish cloth extra scrubbing power; it'll work equally well to clean the gunk off your pots and pans or to exfoliate your skin!

    Once you finish this sampler project you can use you new basket weave crochet skills to make afghans, baby blankets and scarves. Basket weave crochet made simple: it really is easy, I promise!

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    Materials

    In reality, you can crochet this stitch with any yarn and a hook that works well for the gauge of your yarn. For this specific project, however, you'll need the following materials:

    - Worsted weight yarn, cotton or acrylic

    - Crochet hook size US I (5.50 mm)

    - Scissors

    - Large eye blunt needle for weaving in the ends

    I chose to use a size I hook for this project because it would help me give my stitches room to breathe without being too loose. I wanted the stitches fairly close together to accentuate the scrubbing power of the washcloth. However, as you crochet this project you may find you want tighter stitches (in which case you'll need to go down a hook size or two) or looser ones (go up a size or two).

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    Stitch Explanations

    This free crochet wash cloth pattern will use the following stitches:

    • Chain, chain stitch: Yarn over and pull the yarn through the loop on your hook.
    • Double crochet (DC): Yarn over, insert your hook into the indicated stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop. Yarn over and draw through two loops on the hook, then yarn over and draw through the last two loops.
    • Front post double crochet (FPDC): Yan over, insert your hook behind the next double crochet from the previous row. To do this, bring your hook to the front of your work and thread it behind the stitch, moving from right to left and ending with your hook in front of the work again. Yarn over and draw up a loop, then yarn over and draw through two loops on the hook. Yarn over and draw through the final two loops. See the photo section for a visual explanation.
    • Back post double crochet (BPDC): Yarn over, insert your hook around the front of the next double crochet from the previous row. To do this, bring your hook down to the back of the work and push it up in front of the stitch, moving from right to left and ending with your hook behind the work again. Yarn over and draw up a loop, then yarn over and draw through two loops on the hook. Yarn over and draw through the final two loops. See the photo section for a visual explanation.
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    Project Photos

    The finished dishcloth.Making a front post double crochet (FPDC) stitch.One finished FPDC stitch.Making a Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC) stitch.BPDC stitch viewed from the front of the piece.One pattern repeat finished.Side view of texture created by stitch pattern.
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    Pattern Instructions

    Begin with a starting chain that is a multiple of 8, then add 1 more. For my purposes, I wanted a nice, small scrubber I could use on my skin or my dishes, so I began with 16 chains and added 2 more for a total of 17.

    Row 1: Double crochet (DC) in the 3rd chain from the hook and in every chain across; when you finish you'll have 16 DC stitches.

    Row 2: Chain 2, which counts as the first double crochet of the row here and throughout the pattern. Turn. Front Post Double Crochet (FPDC) around the 2nd DC, then Back Post Double Crochet around each of the next four DCs. FPDC over the next 4 stitches, then BPDC over the next 4 stitches; repeat this until you have 2 stitches left in the row. FPDC around the next stitch, then DC in the final stitch.

    Row 3: Chain 2 (counts as DC), turn. BPDC around the next DC, then repeat the following across: FPDC across 4 stitches, BPDC across 4 stitches. When you get to the last two stitches, BPDC around the first one and DC in the last one (top of the turning chain from the previous row).

    Row 4: Same as Row 3.

    Row 5: Same as Row 2.

    Repeat rows 2-5 for the duration of the project.

    For my small dish scrubber, I made a total of 8 rows.

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    Finishing and Next Steps

    In order to finish your free crochet dish cloth scrubber, cut the working yarn, leaving a 4-inch tail. Yarn over and draw this tail through the loop on your hook, pulling gently to secure it. Thread the tail onto a large eye blunt needle and weave it in and out of the stitches on the back side of your crochet wash cloth. Repeat this with the other yarn tail and you're ready to scrub!

    Now that you know the basics of how to make a crochet basket weave stitch, try altering this project to suit your own needs:

    • Start with 33 chain stitches at the beginning of the project for a larger dish cloth or wash cloth.
    • Start the project as above but continue to work in the pattern until the piece measures approximately 5 feet long; now it's a scarf!
    • Make several small squares like this and sew them together for a floor mat or an afghan.
    • Increase your starting chain to 161 and make it into a baby blanket or throw.
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    References

    pattern, directions and images by author

    you may be interested in additional crochet projects here at Bright Hub.