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What is required of a successful dry lab scientist?

written by: ellaalle•edited by: Paul Arnold•updated: 5/6/2008

Obviously, good grades in school and college are necessary, and it helps if you are from a biology background or a math or a computer school background. In fact, more emphasis is laid on a math or a computer school background, along with an incessantly questioning mind.

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    Obviously, good grades in school and college are necessary, and it helps if you are from a biology background or a math or a computer school background. In fact, more emphasis is laid on a math or a computer school background, along with an incessantly questioning mind.

    To be as good as a dry lab scientist, you also need to have a small background in biology, but what is more important is your ability to understand various facets of biology, not a master’s – although that too adds value to being a good dry lab scientist.

    Like every profession, the aspirant must have a constantly questioning mind, and inquisitive nature, and very thick skin. That last is very important. You must be able to under diffuse subjects, going off on tangent, read volumes of biomedical literature, be up to the mark in math modeling, and be a computer genius, all at the same time. You must be up to date on software in the domain of biomedical engineering, biomedical informatics, and you must be able to translate what may sound very, very confusing abstracts to linear or co-linear or a parallel logic system and come up spades in terms of programming software, and manipulate that software according to the rules of the game.

    In other words, your imagination and your skill to debate, assimilate divergent views, and think independently will make you stand out as a successful dry lab scientist. A dry lab scientist deals with abstract theories all the time, and they are constantly looking at different multiple variations at the same time, and it is your job, as a dry lab scientist to stay up to the mark with them, and help them in their diffuse theories and finding ways and means of testing the various hypothesis.

    The key to a successful dry lab scientist is to maintain COMPLETE records of every single activity performed, the time taken, the measures used, the subject, cross reference it to other activities elsewhere, and also put it up for review and others to learn. For it is within that research material lies the golden door to understanding the cell or molecular behavior that is being tried to be located, and immaculate record keeping is the key to that door.