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Xylocaine Jelly

written by: Leigh A. Zaykoski•edited by: Leigh A. Zaykoski•updated: 9/26/2009

Xylocaine jelly is a topical drug that is used to ease pain and discomfort of the skin. Find out what this drug is used for and any possible side effects in this comprehensive drug guide.

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    Brand Names

    This drug is sold under several brand names. It is marketed as Lidocream, AneCream, Anestacon, Lidoderm, LideMantle, AneCream with Tegaderm, Lidosense5, Zilactin-L, Senatec, Bactine, LMX 4 with Tegaderm, Medi-Quik Spray and LMX 5.

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    Uses

    Xylocaine jelly contains lidocaine, which is an anesthetic that numbs the skin. It can be used to reduce the discomfort, pain and irritation of insect bites and stings, sunburn, poison oak, cuts, poison ivy, scratches, poison sumac, burns and hemorrhoids.

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    Administration

    This drug is applied directly to the skin so that the numbing agent in the jelly can block nerve signals that cause pain and discomfort. You can purchase this drug in the form of a film patch, topical cream, spray, film, solution or lotion. Follow the patient guide included with each of these products for instructions on how to safely and effectively use this drug.

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    Side Effects

    An allergic reaction to this drug may occur. Seek medical attention if you experience hives, swelling of the face or tongue, difficulty breathing, rash or swelling of the throat. Serious side effects may occur when using xylocaine jelly. They include blurred vision, seizures, irregular heartbeat, confusion, drowsiness and tremors. These should be reported to a medical professional. Less serious side effects include redness and swelling of the skin, irritation of the skin and numbness at the application site.

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    Drug Interactions

    This drug contains lidocaine, which can interact with some drugs. Tell your doctor if you are taking propafenone, procainamide, mexiletine, disopyramide, quinidine, flecainide or tocainide. You should also inform your doctor about any vitamins, supplements or over the counter drugs you are taking so serious drug interactions can be avoided.

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    Warnings

    It is possible to absorb large amounts of this drug if you use it over a large area of the skin or use the drug along with plastic wrap, heat therapy or bandages. If your skin is irritated or cut, it may absorb more of this medication than desired. Use the smallest amount of this medication possible to relieve pain and discomfort, as large doses of lidocaine can cause serious side effects. Ask a doctor or pharmacist if you need help understanding the instructions that come with the medication.