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Becoming a Nurse Midwife

written by: R. Elizabeth C. Kitchen•edited by: DaniellaNicole•updated: 4/29/2009

This article focuses on becoming a nurse midwife. It discusses education, requirements, salaries and basic facts.

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    Becoming a Nurse Midwife: Introduction

    Becoming a midwife involves much more than just learning about the human body and the birthing process. When searching for an education program it is important to search for one that not only focuses on the medical aspects but one that also focuses on how to mentally and spiritually nurture the birthing mother. It is also important to focus on midwife education programs that are recognized by the state in which you wish to practice midwifery.

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    Becoming a Nurse Midwife: Education Requirements to Become a Nurse Midwife

    The requirements to become a nurse midwife are pretty standard across the United States. However, it is important to make sure that specific states or medical facilities do not require extra training or else you will need to acquire this additional education. In order to be able to practice midwifery, one must complete a nurse-midwifery program. A person's chosen midwife education program must be accredited by the American College of Nurse-Midwives. Once the education program is complete, one must successfully pass the national certification exam. Once a person passes this exam, they are able to practice anywhere in the United States. Be sure to check with the state in which you wish to practice to ensure that they do have any additional midwife education requirements.

    Those who successfully complete a nurse-midwifery program and successfully pass the national exam will be educated in both midwifery and nursing. They can also elect to work as nurses. Becoming a midwife takes time, but many students are able to be fully certified within six years or less (this includes the time it takes to obtain a Bachelor's degree).

    The requirements to begin a nurse midwife education program will vary by school, but most have a basic set of requirements. These requirements can include a minimum of a 3.0 GPA, a current registered nurse license in any of the 50 states and a Bachelor's degree. This degree does not necessarily have to be in nursing. It is important to check the individual requirements of each school you plan to apply to make sure that you can meet all of their minimum requirements.

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    Becoming a Nurse Midwife: Midwife Salaries

    Becoming a nurse-midwife comes with a desirable salary. The average salary for a nurse-midwife is $41,000 to $52,000 per year. Beginning salaries can range from $35,000 to $40,000 per year. Top earning salaries can range from $50,000 to $65,000 per year. A person's salary depends on several factors. These factors include length and type of experience, geographical area, benefits and the institution in which they choose to practice. Nurse midwife salaries vary greatly, but with time and dedication, a nurse midwife salary can become quite lucrative.

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    Unknown. (2009). Become a Certified Nurse-Midwife. Retrieved on April 25, 2009 from Website: