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Sample Offer Letter for Part-Time Employees

written by: Michelle Shuler Key•edited by: Michele McDonough•updated: 3/3/2011

Usually reserved for full-time salaried positions, offer letters have merit for any new employee, even those working part-time. Read on to learn how to compose an offer letter for part-time employees, then download a template to help you get started.

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    Why Send an Offer Letter?

    An offer letter represents an agreement between you and your new employee, and is your opportunity to get things started on the right foot. Ideally you have already agreed upon scheduling, wages and other details for your new hire. The offer letter puts these agreements in writing, allowing the employee to see the full job details on paper before officially accepting the position.

    Although generally only full-time, salaried positions receive an offer letter, part-time employee positions can be an important part of your organization as well. Sales and service workers are frequently employed part-time, and these positions are often the face of your company. Cash registers and reception desks are the front lines of public relations for any business, while those who stock shelves or prepare food are the heart of the service industry. A professional, detailed offer letter shows your new hire that you are aware of his importance to your company, regardless of the job's prestige level.

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    What to Include

    When composing your offer letter, part-time employee details should be emphasized. Scheduling and wages for these employees differ from 23361cpdsvj6gev those in full-time, salaried positions, and part-time workers are not generally eligible for the same benefits as your full-time staff. Both you and your new hire will benefit from a full, detailed offer letter outlining every possible expectation for both parties.

    In addition to the letter itself, send along any other forms you would like filled out prior to the new hire's start date. This can include tax forms, insurance applications, nondisclosure agreements and other relevant documents. Consider which details are most important to cement prior to the new hire's start date and cover as much of this information as possible.

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    Using the Template

    To get started, visit our media library and download the document Offer Letter Part Time Employee. The file includes bracketed sections where information specific to your new hire should be placed, with short examples where necessary. In the finished product, you will remove the brackets and replace the examples with the correct employee information and details most relevant to the position.

    Many of the sections are self-explanatory, while others may be more specific to your situation.

    • The opening paragraph includes areas for your company's name and address, as well as a reference to what impressed you about the employee. This gives you a chance to emphasize the qualities the qualities most important for the position, so be sure to put some thought into how to best personalize this sentence.
    • The main body of the letter covers the details most relevant to an offer letter. Part-time employee wages, benefits and scheduling, as well as job title, classification and other details, are included in this section.
    • Your closing section lists contact information and methods for accepting the offer, as well as an additional welcome message. Close and sign the message, making sure the final line of the document allows the new hire to sign and agree to the terms.

    Image by FreeDigitalPhotos, nuttakit