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Thinking about a Career Change? Non-Teaching Options for Teachers

written by: Lady Lit•edited by: Trent Lorcher•updated: 9/5/2012

This article explores possible career moves that teachers may wish to consider if they are ready to leave the profession. The skills you have developed as a teacher will help you to find a new position, and there are lots of options available to you.

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    Teaching is Not for Everyone

    Many teachers leave the profession within three to five years of entering it due to teacher burnout. Teaching is much more demanding and stressful than it appears. Many people think that teachers teach a couple of classes, get off at three o'clock, go home, and relax.

    Such education myths are not true. Many teachers are responsible for teaching anywhere from three to six classes a day, leave campus sometime after three, go home, work until eight or nine, and spend restless hours in bed thinking about their upcoming parent conference, misbehaving class, or list of upcoming work-related obligations.

    Did I mention that in addition to teaching three to six classes a day, a teacher has to prepare for these classes, plan for these classes, grade student work, and prepare students for life?

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    Career Options

    Let's face it -- after teaching for any length of time, you are qualified to be a ring leader, a police officer, a counselor, a psychologist, a curriculum developer, and a warden. Teachers have a variety of options even if they have a degree in education, and this article will explore some possibilities that teachers can pursue if they are interested.

    1. Textbook Companies

    Such companies employ individuals to write materials for their textbook, as well as individuals to visit schools to sell and promote their textbooks.

    2. Writers

    Many teachers write educational articles for publications, whether Bright Hub, newspapers, union publications, or somewhere else.

    3. Testing Companies

    Many teachers do not want to have anything to do with state testing after teaching, but if you are open to it, many testing companies hire former teachers to develop test questions, materials, etc. With the continued emphasis on standardized testing, this could be an area of continued growth.

    4. Consulting Firms

    If you are an experienced teacher, you may wish to work as an education consultant who works with parents or school districts and helps improve the quality of public education.

    5. Tutoring Institutions

    Sylvan Learning Centers employ teachers to tutor students. Private tutoring sessions are also a way to earn good money, though such sessions need to take place at a public place.

    6. Promotions within the Education Realm

    Look for non-teaching positions within your current school district. You could seek jobs as a Lead Teacher, a Curriculum Developer, or other positions within a school district.

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    Additional Education

    Some teachers decide to return to school, take some non-education related classes, and embark on a new career altogether by earning an additional degree or certification. While this does not necessarily make use of your already hard-won education degree, learning new skills almost always looks good on a resume.