Pin Me

Turnkey Systems: More Than Enough Video Editing Juice

written by: Kumara Velu•edited by: Rhonda Callow•updated: 7/1/2011

Is your computer capable enough for video editing? Does your machine freeze when you’re in the middle of the rendering process? Do you suffer from dropped frames when capturing footage from your DV camera? The time could be well nigh to consider a turnkey video editing system.

  • slide 1 of 3

    The challenge of a turnkey system is to be a cut above any computer video editing system which you can put together at an attractive cost.

    You may want a linear editing system included to enjoy a smoother workflow and integrate seamlessly with analog media like VHS.

    If such are your needs, then you would want to consider a direct linear video editing system.

  • slide 2 of 3

    Direct Linear Video Editing Turnkey System

    A direct linear video editing system lets you enjoy the best of both worlds – linear and non-linear editing. Edirol’s DV-7DL series offers systems ready for both modes of video editing.

    It claims to offer the first non-stop video editing system. It allows you to edit while playing back the video. The Single-menu editing feature allows you to undertake most of your editing from, yes, a single menu. Even A/B roll editing is supported. You get to edit two different video streams simultaneously in real time.

    Software flexibility aside, you’ll be really impressed with the hardware specs of the machine. It covers everything a video editor needs and way beyond what a self-assembled powerful video editing computer could offer.

    Apart from PS2, USB and Firewire ports, there are S-Video, Mic in, Composite Video and Audio I/O ports. The availability of these ports allows you to output your edited video to analog video decks and also DVD recorders.

    All video editing tasks could be performed with the mouse keyboard and computer monitor. However, if you would like to get a feel of linear editing, a T-Bar Controller is included which among others include a jog shuttle dial and sliders to control audio level for some real time AV stream processing. Yes, you can also connect a TV to the system to get the feel of a broadcast station.

  • slide 3 of 3

    HD Editing Turnkey System

    If you’re into high definition video editing and would like to do a good job out of it, you could consider the Sony VAIO RM1N HD editing system.

    It comes with a four-core Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 running at 2.4GHz with a RAM of 2GB. A NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GTS Card with 256MB graphics RAM should give you all the juice you need for editing high definition video.

    It comes in with Windows Vista installed and consists of two separate units.

    The main box houses the motherboard, processor, RAM and graphics card. The smaller unit contains a 50GB Blu Ray burner and DVD reader/writer.

    A monitor is optional but Adobe Premiere Pro is thrown in for your editing needs.

    If you’re a video professional with an underperforming editing system, you may want to consider a turnkey system to enjoy a hassle-free video editing experience and deliver top-quality video to your clients.

More To Explore