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Guide to Nucleic Acids

DNA - US Nat'l Library of MedicineHistorically, DNA—a nucleic acid—was first isolated from cellular nuclei by the nineteenth-century scientist Friedrich Miescher. It took more than eighty years before Nobel prizewinning chemists James Watson and Francis Crick were able to reveal its structure—a marvel of beauty. DNA is not the only member of the nucleic acid family, although it is certainly the most famous. Others include RNA (ribonucleic acid), m-RNA (messenger RNA), and t-RNA (transfer RNA). RNA carries information provided by DNA and is involved in the manufacture of peptides. But this is scratching the surface; there is much to learn. Allow informed Bright Hub contributors to assist you in learning.

Latest Articles on Nucleic Acids
Astrobiology: The "Genes First" Model of the Origin of Life

The second article in the Astrobiology series examines the “genes first” model of the origin of life, and in particular the “RNA world” hypothesis....

How is a Chlamydia Screening Lab Test Done? - Theory and Practice of C.Trachomatis Detection

How is a chlamydia screning lab test done? There are numerous methods of detecting C. trachomatis ('chlamydia') including cell culture, enzyme-immuno assay, direct...

Delving into Macromolecular Modeling

The combining of biochemical techniques with information technology has made it possible to understand higher levels of macromolecular structure. It also opens a vista of potential...

The Importance of Nucleic Acid

Could life be possible without nucleic acids? Probably not. Learn about the importance of nucleic acids in life, genetics, and diseases...

Most Popular Articles on Nucleic Acids
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    The Importance of Nucleic Acid

    Could life be possible without nucleic acids? Probably not. Learn about the importance of nucleic acids in life, genetics, and diseases...

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    Ribonucleic Acid: Where is it Found in the Human Body?

    RNA is primarily a linear nucleic acid polymer. Unlike DNA, it is not a double helix. The most common locations are in the cell nucleus, mitochondria and ribosomes....

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    What Does RNA Stand For?

    RNA stands for ribonucleic acid, and it's very similar to DNA. It can be found in several locations inside cells and plays an integral role in the formation of proteins....

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    Linus Pauling and the Discovery of DNA

    Linus Pauling (1901-1994) was one of the most brilliant scientists of the 20th century. He worked out the structure of proteins and was involved in the race to discover the structure of DNA. That...

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    Oswald Avery and a Big Moment in the History of Genetics

    The history of genetics has been created by many brilliant scientists. However, all the attention goes to only a few big names such as Crick and Watson. Oswald Avery is one of the unsung heroes of genetics...

More About Nucleic Acids
DNA Structure: The Discovery of Nucleic Acid Structure

Long before Crick and Watson had worked out the structure of DNA, Phoebus Levene (1869-1940) had discovered that the cell nucleus contains two types of nucleic acids - DNA and...

Ribonucleic Acid: Where is it Found in the Human Body?

RNA is primarily a linear nucleic acid polymer. Unlike DNA, it is not a double helix. The most common locations are in the cell nucleus, mitochondria and ribosomes....