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A Guide to Recycled Glass Garden Art

written by: Jennifer Gunnerson•edited by: Lindsay Evans•updated: 11/12/2010

Adding to the beauty of an outdoor space with a piece of recycled glass garden art is easier to do than you might think. With more and more artists using recycled materials such as glass to create unique, long lasting outdoor art, recycled glass garden art is becoming more readily available.

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    With “going green" becoming the norm, artists are getting in on the green game by using re-purposed and recycled materials to create their works of art. Perhaps one of the most beautiful trends in eco-friendly art is recycled glass garden art. A whimsical wind chime, a stunning sculpture and even mosaic patterns crafted from mulch can be made beautifully and responsibly with recycled glass.

    Ecological studies show that the amount of energy that is saved from re-using a single glass bottle, rather than manufacturing a new one, can power a 100-watt light bulb for a total of four hours. Recycling a single glass bottle rather than producing one from new materials will create 20% less air pollution and 50% less water pollution.

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    How is Recycled Glass Garden Art Made?

    Recycled glass garden art can be made from recycled glass from a multitude of sources including glass bottles, windows, jars and dishes. Regardless of the original source of the recycled glass, many artists choose to carefully melt the glass in a kiln before pouring it into their desired molds. When creating large garden sculptures, individual glass pieces can be fused together with a silicone sealant, which offers slight flexibility, a vital element for pieces that are to be exposed to wind.

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    Examples of Recyled Glass Garden Art

    Glass FernsGlass Wind ChimesGlass Globes
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    Beach Glass Wind Chimes

    Another way that artists create recycled glass garden art is to use the glass in its raw form rather than melting it down. Beach glass, also called sea glass, is one example of recycled glass that is often used in its natural form. As its name implies, this type of glass is washed upon the shore after the sand and water has smoothed its sharp edges. Beach glass is often used to create beautiful wind chimes that are not only pleasing to look at, but pleasant to listen to. Recycled beach glass wind chimes can be found on websites that offer handmade artisan retailers such as Etsy.com. A simple search for beach glass wind chimes on Etsy will return product results starting under $40.00.

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    Garden Mirror Mosaics

    A mosaic mirror created using recycled glass can add the shimmer of light and color to a garden. These art pieces can be made using recycled stained glass and re-purposed mirrors to capture and reflect the natural beauty of the garden. This type of recycled glass garden art can be readily found on the website Folksy.com starting at $75.00.

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    Recycled Glass Garden Mulch

    Perhaps on of the most easily accessible forms of recycled glass garden art is recycled glass garden mulch. This specialty mulch is uniquely created to be free of sharp edges and is available in a wide variety of colors to suit any landscape. Online retail stores such as Close the Loop.com offers recycled glass garden mulch starting at just $3.99 per pound. One of the key benefits of using this type of decorative mulch is that it is extremely long lasting and will never fade. Garden designers can use this recycled glass mulch to create intricately patterned groundcover, shimmering walkways and decorative fountains.

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    Sources

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yC5nDMCzkZY

    http://www.ecofriend.org/entry/john-bassett-magical-art-molded-out-of-recycled-glass/

    http://www.lindafraser.com/Courses/course_2.htm

    http://folksy.com/items/996301

    http://www.novica.com/itemdetail/index.cfm?pid=99629

    http://www.closetheloop.com/products/gardenglassmulch.html

    Photo Credit: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/E8qZwKWuvV8WUogNL27Tdg

    Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/61897811@N00/3428273388

    Photo Credit: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/9yIofsUCIQhYrA5YyTuGrw

    Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/manueb/3519472812/