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Great Tips on Hosting a Geocaching Event

written by: Daniel P. McGoldrick•edited by: Rhonda Callow•updated: 3/26/2010

These tips on hosting a geocaching event will help you plan and execute a fun and festive occasion for fellow geocachers no matter where you’re holding it or how far they may be coming from. Consider these guidelines for your gathering.

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    Gather that Enthusiasm Together

    Geocache Score! So tips on hosting a geocaching event are what you’re after? You’ve arrived at the right place to find out how you can create the optimum experience for whatever event you wish to have in your neck of the woods. Geocaching is a community event even when folks aren’t gathered together in the same space and time. Normally the only trace you have of other participants is the prizes and trinkets they leave for you to find in the container at the end of you’re seeking on a particular site and any notations or communications found on the web at a site like Geocaching.com.

    But in the case of an event for the purposes of bring together modern-day scavenger hunters and their trusty GPS device companions gather together in the same place. They might swap stories, break bread, do a group or competitive geocache, or perhaps clean up a certain area for the betterment of the environment.

    There are many reasons to hold events, and you are free to come up with any reason you deem important or enjoyable. We have already on our site articles on events specifically in Iowa and the UK in Scotland (Scotland hosts a Mega-event which means at least 500 people show up). Incidentally, if you’re and accomplished cacher looking for really demanding places to practice your skills, here’s a series dedicated to the Most Challenging Sites in the U.S.

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    Helpful Tips On Hosting a Geocaching Event of Your Own

    • Organize a meet and great soiree at the beginning with the whole name tag thing and a welcoming atmosphere.
    • Food and beverages for the folks should be arranged for at least one meal (provided it’s not all coming out of your pocket unless you’re really generous). If it's a long day or weekend-long event they can be on their own or to eat other meals or alternatively; you can specify a pot-luck kind of deal. Arranging for food vendors is an option too.
    • Get it sanctioned by your local, statewide or regional geocaching organization that has its own website (they will have their own criteria and ideas too for sanctioned events).
    • Carefully plan the games that will be played or the geocaches that will be hidden on the site you choose.
    • Parking and restrooms must be accounted for; it's easier if the site already has this along with a place to shelter up if inclement weather invades your gathering.
    • Here’s the form event form to register it on Geocaching.com (this is very helpful for the additional tips provided and a log which will allow folks to log whether they will be attending).
    • Indicate the specific reason for the event such as trading geocaching coins, community service, and themed seminars.
    • Maybe try and get GPS manufacturers there with a booth, their business counts on you folks.
    • If they’re coming from far places, travelling and accommodation information should be provided.
    • At the very least, post all this news about the event two weeks before it, although ideally you want to give people way more notice than that.
    • Maybe you should also have an emergency cache that is very difficult to find and far, far away made especially for any special attendees that show up and are clearly going to be obnoxious and annoying for the entire event. Hopefully you’ll never have to use it, just like the nations with nuclear arsenals.
    • Kids tend to enjoy these picnic-like events; they’re great outings for the whole family. Geocaching for Kids is a Grand Idea makes the case for why this hobby is so beneficial to them for all the skills and traits it will instil in them.

    There’s your comprehensive list. Remember it’s all about fun and generating enthusiasm. Make folks feel welcome and included and you’ll all have a grand old time.