Pin Me

Adjustments to Make When Joining a Special Education Class

written by: Victoria Trix•edited by: Elizabeth Stannard Gromisch•updated: 3/10/2010

Many parents are concerned their children will have problems adjusting to special education classes, but the simple truth is that their adjustment is based on the attitude they learn to adopt towards their special education classes.

  • slide 1 of 1

    Students and Adjustments in the Classroom

    If you are worried about your child joining a special education class, you are not alone. Many parents get concerned about their child having to join special education because they are concerned their children will not adjust well. Letting your child go into preschool on the first day is hard enough for parents, but learning that they may have a learning disability which often makes sending their children to school even harder. Many parents often blame themselves for their child’s disability which adds to their confusion and questions.

    However, as a parent you should know your child will be able to adjust just fine to their special education classes and that there is no need to be concerned. Special education teachers receive special training to aid your child in catching up with the rest of their class and learning how to adjust academically in a normal classroom setting by teaching the material to match their altered comprehension patterns. Sometimes, by addressing the problem with a child at a younger age, they can learn in a normal classroom with other children because they learn how to manipulate their learning problems. In some ways, special education classes teach a child how to be smarter logically than other children as they think around their disability while completing their assignments.

    One of the largest adjustments your child is going to have to face is being separated from his peers for a partial part of the day or a whole day. This may result in him or her feeling alienated and different from their friends, although typically they will still eat lunch and have recess with them. You can help aid this transaction by making sure you plan regular play dates with your child and their classmates and friends so they do not feel left out, but instead feel like they are getting an extra treat. This is turn will change their perception when they have to leave class to go to special education classes.

    The teachers in their program understand this principle as well, which is why they often try to include games in their teaching methods so a child feels privileged and is highly motivated to learn instead of sullen when attending their classes. How well your child responds to special education is determined by their attitude towards it, therefore, it is very important they never overhear you speaking negatively about their classes.