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Final Presentation Ideas for a College Communication Class

written by: Mihir Shah•edited by: Amanda Grove•updated: 8/19/2010

Final presentations in a college communication class are generally open ended. As a result, there are a myriad of ideas for presentations. These ideas can be grouped into three categories: the "How to Make _______," "Show and Tell," and "Follow Me."

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    Communication Classes

    The reason most people take communication classes is because it's a general education requirement, or they love to interact. This is one class where talking with your peers won't result in scolding or punishment from the teacher. At the end of the class, of course, there is the infamous final exam. The goal of communication classes is to help the individual articulate ideas. The final presentation for communications classes is the students' chance to demonstrate what he has learned in the class. There are a wealth of ideas for a final presentation in a college communications class, including the "How to Make _________" presentation, the "Show and Tell" presentation, and the "Follow Me" presentation." Each idea must be executed precisely to have the desired effect.

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    "How to Make __________ " Final Presentation Idea

    One of the most popular final presentation ideas is the "How to Make ____." Essentially, the student can show the class how to make practically anything. Common presentations ideas include, "How to Make Origami," "How to Make a Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich with M&M's," "How to dance the salsa," etc. While making origami or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich can be relatively stress free, presenting a salsa tutorial can be packed with energy and result in a very fulfilling experience and a grand response from your classmates. When giving a final presentation, it is smart to involve the crowd. For example, have someone join you in dancing the salsa.

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    "Show and Tell" Final Presentation Idea

    Beginning in grade school, the "Show and Tell," became a hit with students. The main reason for this is because students would generally bring something that had value to them on a personal level. Moving up to the college level, "show and tell" is one of the more effective ideas for final presentations in a college communication class. The student can bring his "circus" dog to class and create a thrilling environment. Pets are a commonality for a final presentation; however, other ideas include famous relatives, grandfathers, etc. Ranging on the bizarre level of presentation ideas, students can bring their vacuums, favorite childhood toys, girlfriend or best friend, and the list goes on. For those students that want to maintain a more ordinary environment, presentation ideas can include books and albums.

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    "Follow Me" Final Presentation Idea

    The "Follow Me" final presentation idea involves using the outdoors as a prop. Male students have routinely used sports as part of their presentation. Taking the entire class onto the basketball court and making a presentation on how to play basketball, football, soccer, baseball, etc. This type of presentation should feel like a guided tour of an unfamiliar area or aspect of life. For example, if there is a botanical garden in the particular college, botany aficionados can present the different types of plants, flowers, etc. The key for this type of presentation is that the individual himself must have an interest in the topic. Again, there needs to be student involvement in this presentation idea for it to be successful.

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    Conclusion

    While there are a multitude of final presentation ideas for a college communication class, the "How to make _______," "Show and Tell," and the "Follow Me," final presentation ideas are most common. These three formats can encompass nearly any type of presentation. The key for any type of presentation is to enunciate, pace yourself, and involve the audience.

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    Suggested Reading

    1) http://commstudies.ucla.edu/courses